CHEM 306 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY II

SECOND Semester (002)

Text:   

*    Inorganic Chemistry, Gary L. Miessler and Donald A. Tarr, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ 1999.

Additional References:

*    Basic Inorganic Chemistry, F. Albert Cotton, Geoffrey Wilkinson,  and Paul L. Gaus 3rd Edition, John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1995.

*    Inorganic Chemistry, Duward Shriver and Peter W. Atkins, 3rd Edition, W. H. Freeman, New York, 1999.

General Information:

Recent years have brought a resurgence in interest in the "discipline" of Inorganic Chemistry. This revitalization of the oldest of the "disciplines" of chemistry is due in part to the continual discovery of new, exotic classes of compounds, such as those of the inert gases, metal clusters and cage compounds, boron hydrides, organometallics, coordination compounds containing metal-metal quadruple bonds and biologically important compounds whose function is dependent on the presence of a metal ion. Today, the boundaries of inorganic chemistry, which indeed encompasses the study of the structure, reactivity and diverse chemistry of all the elements, are ill-defined and may range from physical and organic chemistry to the edges of theoretical physics and molecular biology.  

Lab:

·       One of the main goals of the lab is to learn to do chemical lab work independently and thus acquire confidence in your professional skills.  Thus, you must read the experiment and understand it thoroughly before coming to the lab.  Expect a quiz every lab.

·       Students are required to complete each experiment; failure to do so will have a negative effect on the final course grade.

·       Each student is responsible for maintaining cleanliness and order in the lab, and each is expected to share in maintaining cleanliness and order in sinks, hoods, and general use areas.  Lockers are stocked to provide the special equipment needed for this course.

·       Written reports are required for all experiments.  Reports should contain the following sections: introduction, experimental, results, discussion, and references. The experimental section should be written in a style similar to that used in The Journal of Inorganic Chemistry.  The reports, which will be graded, should be as concise as possible.  Typed or word-processed reports are recommended.

                                  Study/Discussion Syllabus

 Week                           Topic

1                   Introductory Remarks, Learning to Learn Chemistry,

                        CH-9. Coordination Chemistry I: Structures and Isomers.

2                  CH-9. Coordination Chemistry I: Structures and Isomers.

3                  CH-10. Coordination Chemistry II: Bonding.

4                  CH-10. Coordination Chemistry II: Bonding.

5                  CH-11. Coordination Chemistry III: Electronic Spectra.

6                  CH-11. Coordination Chemistry III: Electronic Spectra.

7                  CH-12. Coordination Chemistry IV: Reactions and Mechanisms.

8                  CH-12. Coordination Chemistry IV: Reactions and Mechanisms.

9                  CH-13. Organometallic Chemistry.

10                 CH-13. Organometallic Chemistry.

11                  CH-14. Organometallic Reactions and Catalysis.

12                 CH-14. Organometallic Reactions and Catalysis.

13                 CH-15. Parallels Between Main Group and 

                    Organometallic Chemistry

14                 CH-15. Parallels Between Main Group and 

                     Organometallic Chemistry.

15                 CH-16. Bioinorganic and Environmental 

                    Chemistry.

16                 CH-16. Bioinorganic and Environmental 

                    Chemistry, Review.  

                                                

                                                 Stay Focused…Good Luck!